The recipes of Pellegrino Artusi

21 original recipes from the most famous Italian cookbook!

"There are two main functions of life: nutrition and propagation of the species...." (Pellegrino Artusi)

There is not a kitchen shelf in Italy that doesn't include the famous cookbook written by Pellegrino Artusi: Science in the Kitchen and the Art of Eating Well. Practical Manual for Families of 1891. It features 790 recipes, patiently collected over time by the author during countless journeys. Artusi's manual has become one of the most important Italian cookbooks, the one that all chefs have drawn on for inspiration and suggestions.

The first cookbook of Italian home cooking

It's not just a cookbook, but a book dedicated to eating well, to flavors and good food, written with simplicity and a congenial tone. The primary cookbook of reference until the second half of the 1900s, Artusi's manual gave prestige and value to those homemade recipes that until then had been mostly handed down orally from generation to generation, without ever being printed!

Who was Pellegrino Artusi?

Pellegrino Artusi was born in 1820 in Forlimpopoli into a wealthy, large family. He studied at the University of Bologna, then upon returning home he moved with his family to the Grand Duchy of Toscana. It was here that Artusi started a factoring company. But in 1855 in Livorno he unknowingly came into contact with cholera and stopped to dine at a tavern in the city. After eating vegetable soup he spent the night suffering cramps and pains, blaming the soup he'd eaten, and then discovered that the entire city has actually been hit by a cholera epidemic. It was this story that gave him the idea to write his famous, personal soup recipe!

On August 4th we celebrate Pellegrino Artusi at FICO

On August 4th here at FICO we celebrate the birthday of Artusi in a special way, within a program dedicated to the White Night of Italian Food. The famous gourmand thus becomes a symbol of national culinary unity!

In addition to an exhibition dedicated to the author, you will have the unique opportunity to taste 21 original recipes from the famous cookbook made by the chefs of our restaurants! A way to rediscover our wonderful traditional Italian cuisine!

Explore the events of the White Night of Italian Food → https://www.eatalyworld.it/en/the-white-night-of-italian-food

The 21 original Artusi recipes made at FICO

Here are the 21 recipes by Pellegrino Artusi taken from his Science in the Kitchen and the Art of Eating Well that you can enjoy in our restaurants:

  • Cappelletti Romagna Style / Tortellini Bologna Style (Fabbrica dei sughi – Amerigo) They are called cappelletti (or "little hats") because of their hat-like shape. This is the easiest way to make them so that they are less heavy on the stomach. 180 grams (about 6 1/3 ounces) of ricotta, or half ricotta and half "raviggiolo" (a soft cheese made from goat or sheep milk) | 1/2 capon breast cooked in butter, seasoned with salt and pepper and finely chopped with a "mezzaluna" | 30 grams (about 1 ounce) of grated Parmesan cheese | 1 whole egg and 1 egg yolk | A dash of nutmeg, a few spices, some lemon zest (if desired) | A pinch of salt ...When you hear someone speak of Bolognese cooking, salute it, because this cooking deserves it. It is somewhat heavy perhaps because the climate requires it, but it is also succulent, tasty and healthy. This may explain why in Bologna a life span of 80 or 90 years is more common than elsewhere. The following tortellini, though simpler and less costly than the preceding ones, are just as good—as you will learn when you taste them. 30 grams (about 1 ounce) of untrimmed prosciutto | 20 grams (about 2/3 of an ounce) of Bolognese mortadella | 60 grams (about 2 ounces) of ox marrow | 60 grams (about 2 ounces) of grated Parmesan cheese | 1 egg | A dash of nutmeg | Salt and pepper
  • Tortelli (Osteria dei Borghi più belli d'Italia – Ecce Italia) 200 grams (about 7 ounces) of ricotta or raviggiuolo (soft white cheese), or both mixed together • 40 grams (about 1 1/3 ounces) of Parmesan cheese • 1 whole egg and 1 egg yolk • A dash of nutmeg and spices • A pinch of salt • A little parsley, chopped....
  • Tagliatelle Romagna Style (Pasta Fresca – SfogliAmo) "Bills should be short and tagliatelle long," the people of Bologna say, and they are right, because long bills terrify poor husbands and short tagliatelle look like leftovers, attesting to the incompetence of their maker. For this reason I do not approve of the widespread custom adopted simply to satisfy the palate of foreigners of chopping capellini, taglierini and similar types of pasta into the minutest bits and serving them in broth. Since they are unique to Italy, they ought to preserve their original characteristics...
  • Spaghetti with Anchovies (Pasta secca di grano duro – Di Martino) This is an appetizing meatless pasta dish. Use medium-size spaghetti, which are preferable to those double-bass strings, which are excellent if you have the stomach of a lumberjack. 350 grams (about 12 1/4 ounces) are more than enough to feed four people with a normal appetite, and for this amount of pasta five anchovies should suffice....
  • Country-Style Spaghetti (Ristorante Bell'Italia – Camst) Finely chop two garlic cloves and a few sprigs of parsley, as well as some basil leaves, if you like the taste. Saute in a good measure of olive oil. As soon as the garlic starts to turn golden brown, toss in 6 or 7 chopped tomatoes, seasoning with salt and pepper.... 
  • Canapes with Chicken Livers and Sage (Il Pollo - Il Campese by Amadori) Put the chicken livers on the fire together with a battuto made with a shallot or, if you do not have any, a section of a small white onion, a small piece of fat trimmed from prosciutto, a few sprigs of parsley, celery and carrot, seasoned with a little olive oil and butter, as well as salt and pepper. Be sparing with the amounts, so that the resulting mixture will not turn out too spicy or heavy.... 
  • Salted Codfish Mont Blanc Style (La Bottega del Vino - Fontanafredda) How strange is the nomenclature associated with cuisine! Why white mountain and not yellow mountain, as one would think from the color this dish takes when made? And how could the French, demonstrating their usual boldness when it comes to metaphors, have stretched their name for this dish into Brandade de morue...? […]
  • Poached Eggs (La locanda dell'uovo – Eurovo) Crack the eggs when the water boils, and drop them in from a very short distance. When the white coagulates and the yolk stops quivering, remove them with a slotted spoon and flavor with salt, pepper, cheese and butter.... 
  • Crescioni (La Piadina – i piadinari) Why they are called "crescioni" and not spinach fritters, I have no idea. I know that the spinach is cooked as it normally is, that is, without water, then squeezed well and coarsely chopped into a soffritto of olive oil, garlic, parsley, salt and pepper. Then it is seasoned with a little concentrated must and raisins, from which the seeds have been removed....
  • Stuffed Potato Nuggets – potato cake (Bistrot della patata – Pizzoli) 300 grams (about 10-1/2 ounces) of potatoes • 2 heaping tablespoons of grated Parmesan cheese • 2 eggs • A dash of nutmeg • Flour, as much as needed.... This dish, like the one in recipe 443, can be served as an entremets or with cotechino or zampone. • 500 grams (about 1 pound) of nice, big, starchy potatoes • 50 grams (about 1 2/3 ounces) of butter • 1/2 a glass of fresh milk or heavy cream • 2 tablespoons of grated Parmesan cheese • 2 eggs • Salt to taste....
  • Sausage with Eggs (Birreria – Baladin) Eggs and sausages together do not make for bad company, nor for that matter does diced bacon. Since the eggs are somewhat bland, and the sausages or bacon are very savory, their marriage produces a taste that delights many, even though we are talking about ordinary dishes....
  • Meatballs (La carne – Zivieri – La Granda) Do not think for a moment that I would be so pretentious as to tell you how to make meatballs. This is a dish that everyone knows how to make, beginning with the jackass, which was perhaps the first to provide the model for the meatball for the human race. My sole intention is to tell you how to prepare them when you have leftover boiled meat. Should you wish to make them more simple, or with raw meat, you will not need as much seasoning....
  • Eggplant Casserole (Parmigiano Reggiano - Consorzio Parmigiano Reggiano) Peel 7 or 8 eggplants, cut into thin round slices, and salt them to draw out some of their water. After letting them sit for a few hours, dredge them in flour and fry in oil.... 
  • Fresh Tuna / Grilled Tuna (Il mare di Guido – Guido da Rimini) Tuna, a fish from the mackerel family, is native to the Mediterranean basin. During certain seasons, it lives in the deepest parts of the sea, while at other times of the year it moves near the shore, where it is caught in great numbers....
  • Fried Anchovies (Osteria del fritto  Gaetano e Pasquale Torrente) If you want to give a nicer appearance to fried anchovies or sardines, after you've removed the heads and dredged them in flour, pick them up by the tail one by one, dip them in well-salted beaten egg, and then again in the flour, before tossing them in a pan of hot oil.
  • Cuttlefish with Peas (Pescheria – Nave Errante) Finely chop a rather generous mixture of onion, a clove of garlic, and parsley. Put it on the fire with oil, salt, and pepper. Strain when it has browned, squeezing well against the mesh....
  • Flatbread with Cracklings / Portuguese-style Flatbread (Bistrot della panetteria – Il Forno Calzolari) 500 grams (about 1 pound) of flour • 200 grams (about 7 ounces) of fine powdered sugar • 160 grams (about 5 2/3 ounces) of butter • 150 grams (about 5 1/4 ounces) of cracklings • 60 grams (about 2 ounces) of lard • 4 tablespoons Marsala or white wine • 2 whole eggs and 2 yolks • Lemon zest....
  • English Trifle (Culatello e Salumi di Parma – Antica Ardenga) In Tuscany, due to the region's climate and also because the stomach of its inhabitants has become accustomed to this manner of cooking, the emphasis is on making dishes that turn out light and, whenever possible, rather runny. Thus, the custard there is silky smooth, made without starch or flour, and customarily served in little cups. Yet while it is true that a custard prepared in this fashion is more delicate to the taste, it does not lend itself to English trifle, which is prepared in a mold, nor is it particularly impressive in appearance....

Download all 21 original recipes from the Pellegrino Artusi Cookbook that you can enjoy in our restaurants!